No, I'm not in the wrong bathroom.
prettycolors:

#6f8390
nadimnida:

"The Last Billboard" 
A 36-foot-long billboard located at the corner of Highland and Baum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Every month, a different individual is invited to take over the billboard to broadcast personalized messages, which are spelt out using wooden letters that are changed by hand.

longhopedforbullet:

what a combination

(Source: eldigoblog)


clementinevonradics:

Last Conversation between Malcom X and his Daughter, Javon Johnson

I think about this poem constantly.


biliusronald:

Brothers On A Hotel Bed | Death Cab For Cutie 

"No longer easy on the eyes but these wrinkles masterfully disguise the youthful boy below.
Who turned your way and saw something he was not looking for, both a beginning and an end.
But now he lives inside someone he does not recognize when he catches his reflection on accident.”

No shame loving death cab lately. No shame.


While Anne Frank may be the face of the Holocaust of European Jewry, the memory of the experiential reality of the Holocaust is male. The way we conceptualize and remember the concentration camp experience is constructed by male narratives. More Jewish men survived the Holocaust than Jewish women. Due to attitudes towards education in the interwar period, more male Jewish survivors had the education and literary capital needed to craft enduring narratives of their experiences than did female Jewish survivors. There are three foundational male Holocaust survival narratives: Night by Elie Wiesel, Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi, and Maus by Art Spiegelman about his father’s Holocaust experience. Never have I seen those three men and their narratives used as a joke, or a meme, or a cheap narrative device, or as self-promotion by an American pop star.

These men are revered, and their narratives taken extremely seriously. And none of them, none of them have been used in a prop in a story about terminally ill gentile American teenagers. They survived, in perhaps the type of heroic arc a John Green protagonist would yearn for. Yet Augustus doesn’t look to them. He doesn’t share a kiss with his girlfriend at Auschwitz. He shared a kiss with her in the Anne Frank House.

Anne Frank is not a prop. She is not a symbol, she is not a teenager who happened to die of an illness, and she is not one of the canonical Jewish male survivors. She is one of many millions of Jewish women and girls who were industrially murdered like livestock, incinerated, and left in an unmarked grave.

- Great quote from a great blog, historicity-was-already-taken. I excerpted it because I wanted to highlight her analysis of the female experience of the Holocaust without too much John Green involved. [x] (via bride-of-bucky)